richard-russell:

I hope Bobby realises how much his music will mean to people forever.







(Source: pleathe)



"When an artist like Riff Raff comes along, listeners jump to the obvious conclusion: as a white artist, he must have agency. He must be faking it, perhaps mocking black expressionism. But what if he isn’t?"

David Drake reviews NEON iCON, the debut album from rap absurdist RiFF RAFF.





Listen to High Life, the collaborative new album from Brian Eno and Underworld's Karl Hyde, via Pitchfork Advance. 

Listen to High Life, the collaborative new album from Brian Eno and Underworld's Karl Hyde, via Pitchfork Advance






"Raptor", the bouncy-castle banger of a single from Glasgow producer Rustie, is a Best New Track.



"What would shoegaze sound like if it had its eyes on the sky?"

Lindsay Zoladz reviews Sea When Absent, the latest album from genre-busting sextet A Sunny Day in Glasgow—and a Best New Music pick.




youngturksrecords:

Enjoy the new video for FKA twigs’ new single, Two Weeks, directed by Nabil.




the-tumblerblog:

Pitchfork Podcast 29: Lana Del Rey’s Sublime Sadness by pitchfork



"Tom Krell is informed by genre but driven by expression; in his mind, pop music is anything that aspires for the most immediate and impactful connection, even if it risks embarrassment in the process. As a result, his transcendent third LP "What Is This Heart?" is a pop album of the highest caliber."

— Ian Cohen reviews How to Dress Well’s new album, our latest Best New Music pick.



Lindsay Zoladz details the campy and vulnerable “Tumblr teen-girl aesthetic” in her latest Ordinary Machines column: “For girls who are aware that our culture expects them to be benignly happy, shiny objects—smile for me, baby—there can be a defiance in not only embracing sadness online, but cultivating a kind of ambiguity as to where the performed feeling ends and the ‘genuine’ feeling begins. Enter Lana Del Rey’s Ultraviolence—a record which seemed to emerge fully formed from this aesthetic.”

Lindsay Zoladz details the campy and vulnerable “Tumblr teen-girl aesthetic” in her latest Ordinary Machines column: “For girls who are aware that our culture expects them to be benignly happy, shiny objects—smile for me, baby—there can be a defiance in not only embracing sadness online, but cultivating a kind of ambiguity as to where the performed feeling ends and the ‘genuine’ feeling begins. Enter Lana Del Rey’s Ultraviolence—a record which seemed to emerge fully formed from this aesthetic.”